Weekly Update April 29th to May 3rd, 2019

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REMINDER:  Staff meeting on Wednesday!  Bring your evidence for completion of your Domain 3 & 4 elements.


The Character Education Academy team would like your feedback!

Please take a few minutes to express your feedback on this year’s Character Education Academy via the survey below.

https://forms.gle/fxoaYWAg8UEaRCgP9


We will be using the State Test Master Schedule from Tuesday to Friday this week to facilitate the NYS Math Assessment.


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Good Read of the Week

Classroom Eye Candy 1: A Flexible-Seating Paradise by Jennifer Gonzalez

Several weeks ago, I posted an article on my Facebook page about student fidgeting and the advantages of flexible seating. One teacher who commented was high school teacher Rebecca Malmquist, who described her own flexible classroom: “I have taken all the conventional desks out and replaced them with mostly tables and a number of different kinds of chairs; I’ve used garage sales and the generosity of friends to furnish my room this way. My classroom looks like a college apartment. But I also build in transitions every 15 minutes or so that require movement (to get into groups, turn something in, write on a paper-covered wall, etc). I have little to no fidgeting problems or issues with attention loss.”

Intrigued, I asked to see a picture. Rebecca obliged, and then I lost my mind: “YOU HAVE THE PRETTIEST CLASSROOM E-VER,” I shouted at her. “I WANT TO BE IN YOUR ROOM!!! I CAN’T STOP YELLING! OKAY, I’M OFFICIALLY STARTING A GALLERY OF BEAUTIFUL CLASSROOM PHOTOS AND YOURS IS GOING TO BE THE FIRST ONE.”

And so Classroom Eye Candy was born.

Classroom Eye Candy will be a feature where I invite you to join me in ogling creative classroom design in any form. We will learn about the teacher behind the classroom and the process he or she used to put it all together. I have no idea when the next one will be or how often I will post these features. All I know for sure is the criteria: I’ll know I’ve found the next classroom when I start writing in all caps.

Read more at Cult of Pedagogy


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Another Good Read of the Week

5 Ways to Design Your Teacher-led Station by Catlin Tucker

In my work as a blended learning coach, I observe a lot of teachers facilitating blended lessons. The Station Rotation Model is particularly popular because teachers do not need a device for every student to make it work. Instead, students rotate between offline and online stations.

One concern I have about this model is the way teachers design and facilitate their teacher-led station. Instead of using this station exclusively for direct instruction, I’d like to see more teachers mix it up. Below I describe five different strategies teachers can use to design their station to avoid talking the entire time. When teachers engage students at their teacher-led station, they can collect invaluable formative assessment data that can help inform future lessons.

#1 Hook the Group

Begin your station with a challenge or problem and allow pairs of students to work together to solve it. As they discuss the challenge or problem, observe them. Their conversations will provide invaluable information about what they know, what they are unsure of, and what additional instruction or practice they may need. As they work, you also have a few minutes to “take a lap” around the room to check in with the other groups and make sure they understand what they are supposed to do.

Then when you return to your group, you can ask pairs to share their process for solving the problem. You can use their explanations to drive a debrief in which you highlight strong strategies and answer questions. Finally, you can provide instruction/modeling for the group.

#2 I Do, We Do, You Do

This is a classic flow that works well at a teacher-led station. You begin with an explanation and model how to do something (e.g., solve a problem or structure a written response). Then you guide the group in another example where students chime in with their ideas. Once the group has worked through a problem or task, you can put students in pairs (random or strategic pairing) to work through another problem with peer support. Finally, students work independently to continue applying and you can circulate around the group to support individual students who may be struggling to complete the practice on their own.

In this flow, the moments when the pairs are working to solve the problem or apply the new information, you have time to take a lap and check in with other groups.

Read more at CatlinTucker.com


St. Lawrence Central Elementary Calendar

If you can’t see this, then you need to go to the actual blog post instead of just looking at the email.

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St. Lawrence Central Elementary’s Action Items
from our 2018-19 Goals

  • Rigor, Relevance and Relationships (as led by the School Improvement Team)
    • School-wide implementation of monthly character traits
  • Embedding the Philosophy and Practices of the Next Generation Learning Standards (as led by the principal)
    • iReady will be implemented as the school’s ELA and Math norm referenced assessment for benchmarking and progress monitoring
    • All students who fall below proficiency in ELA and math will receive AIS services.
    • Writing Workshop Horizon 1 of 3- Building Capacity:  Interested educators will pilot writing workshop in their classroom
  • Professional Learning Community (as led by the elementary staff)
    • Each grade level will implement the Mystery Science curriculum to completion.

    newstip

    News Tip Hotline

    Do you have news to share with our school, district, or community?  Whether it be by webpage article, BFCSD Facebook post, morning/afternoon announcement, or text message sent to our group, we’ve got you covered!  Please be aware that each submission will be reviewed and approved prior to distribution.  Share your news here:  https://goo.gl/forms/VJeQQyFWk8G8hFPN2

 

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